18.11.2016

Weekly News Update

Credit: http://www.maritime-executive.com/article/private-maritime-security-but-with-government-forces

Nigeria (11.11.16): A Cyprus-based security firm, Diaplous Maritime Services, has announced a new Nigeria division offering private security maritime services. According to Peter Cook, director of the Security Association for the Maritime Industry, Nigeria’s regulations for PMSCs would require a different model than the one seen in the High Risk Area of Somalia. Diaplous Maritime Services is certified by LQRA Greece to the maritime security management system standard ISO/PAS 28007.

 

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India (14.11.16): The Union Minister of State for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, Rajiv Pratap Rudy, revealed today that private security guards in the country will be recognised with a Star Badge. This badge highlights that the guards have been trained and certified by the Security Sector Skill Development Council (SSSDC).  Furthermore, each badge will be embedded with the SSSDC logo and barcode to give private security forces a special status which will contribute to the security guards dignity and professional confidence. 

 

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United States (15.11.16): Private Security firm Picore International landed a spot on the Inc. 5000 list, the most prestigious ranking of the US fast growing private companies. Picore International provides security services for educational institutions, museums, financial institutions, mobile carriers and more. 

 

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United Kingdom (18.11.16): Two former child soldiers have threatened legal action against UK private security company, Aegis Defence Services, over psychological harm that they experienced when they were hired to work as security guards in Iraq. These two young men fought in Sierra Leone as children and were among the 2,500 personnel recruited from the country to work in Iraq by Aegis Defence Services and other security companies. These private security companies further exploited the new recruits from Sierra Leone by paying them as little as £13 a day. A former senior director of Aegis defended the practice of hiring personnel from Sierra Leone as a standard practice because they were cheaper than Europeans.

 

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